Servos Wired

Over the last few days, I have worked my way along to completing the servo installations for Comstock Road. There was a bunch of other wiring tasks required that got done while I procrastinated on the servos themselves. When I actually got around to them, things went reasonably well although I did have to get out the multimeter at one point to debug what turned out to be an insufficiently inserted Anderson connector lug.

More or less in order, I did the following:

  • installed the board that holds the Octopus board and relays
  • connected the control panel to above. (OK, order did matter here)
  • ran wires from the relays to frog feeders
  • ran a servo cable from the controller to the runaround turnout which is the only servo not on the center baseboard section
  • applied Anderson Powerpole connectors to the runaround servo cable to span the gap between baseboards and jumper connectors to both ends
  • ran a cable and jumpered the other servo run which is not right next to the control board
  • bent up the link wires and installed them through 1/16th” brass tubes
  • actually installed the servos
  • tested everything, (multimeter comes in here)

The next step will be to make up the throw bars and link them up so I can align the servos and run some trains.

Here is the control board wired up. I used some small wire wraps to tidy things up a bit. Without the wraps, the y-cables connecting control panel, relay and controller made a bit of a rats nest.wiredcontrolboard.jpg

At the other end of the center section, I created a “cable” by wrapping all the wires going into the Anderson plugs with electrical tape. This makes it less likely that the smaller gauge wires will get damaged when the connection is made and unmade.wiringharness.jpg

Note that only the white and grey DCC bus wires look like they need these robust connectors. In fact, I had to solder the servo and frog wire to the lugs before crimping them since the crimp isn’t tight enough to grab the small gauge wires.

3 thoughts on “Servos Wired”

    1. If I had to start from scratch, I would seriously consider some sort of all mechanical approach as long as I could avoid reaching into the scene. (choke cables, rodding and a frame, etc.) I had this gear in store unused from the previous overly ambitious project.

      DCC is a choice in part because the majority of my locos unbuilt are On30 (aka O16.5) critters which would represent more of a challenge in the battery department than cleaning track!

      The electronics bit is part of the plan to “liven” things up for the techie inclined younger sorts. By the time I get to the next project, I will officially be a curmudgeon and have infinite license to do things in old-fashioned ways. 🙂

      Like

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