Freehand Rail Filing

Stephen Gardiner was kind enough to complement the quality of my incorrect filed angle and although I think he was just trying to make me feel better I did consider that perhaps describing my technique might be useful to someone. Having never done an instructional type of post, it will be a good exercise for me. All are encourage to ask questions if I have left something out!

So, you’ve got a piece of rail and you want to file the end to a particular angle.filingstart

I start by marking the angle on the top of the rail. I also sometimes mark the bottom as well or just the bottom depending on what seems necessary. If you are prone to getting an unwanted vertical angle as you file, do both so you can catch yourself at it. Machinists typically use a blue marking die which one either paints or sprays on. It is lacquer based so it smells and it takes a solvent to get it off again. For small jobs, I use a big Sharpie maker; an alternative I learned about in Simon Bolton’s books. The marker will do a 4″x10″ sheet of brass in less than a minute of vigorous scribbling if you need to.filingmarking

I then use an engineer’s protractor to get the proper angle and a machinist’s scriber to make a mark in the blacked area on the rail.filinglayout

The marker makes the scratch from the scriber easy to see.filingmarked

After that, we get to the actual filing. I use a 12″ single cut file for most of my filing. This is less aggressive than default double cut file you get at the hardware store. You can usually find the single cut ones if you look. As far as actual technique, I grip the rail in my fingers and rub it back and forth on the file which I either lay on the bench or my lap. I find it easier to see and check the angle mark as opposed to clamping the rail and moving the file.filinggrip

I check every dozen strokes or so to see how I am doing and adjust as necessary to try and keep the filing parallel to the mark on the rail. Eventually, I usually get down to the mark. If I mess it up, I either remark the end and take some more off or start on a new piece if I can’t spare any more length.filingfinished

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Beginner Brass Bodging

I have previously mentioned some books on model related metal work by Simon Bolton and Kenneth C. Foran. My soldering and brass shaping skills are rudimentary at best and I did not feel comfortable plunging directly into rolling stock construction so I set out to find a simpler project. While walking past a construction site, I hit upon the answer, a roll off waste bin. These ubiquitous items of the modern era are locally sourced and constructed from metal sheet and structural shapes. Just like those in the metal rack at the hobby shop!

I cast about for a suitable example and discovered that most waste disposal companies provide overall dimensions for their bins as well as photos thereof. Just the thing for the modeler in need. Subject identified, I prepared a basic dimensioned drawing and set about acquiring the necessary brass square tube sizes and sheets.

I made good progress but there was an issue. My Hakko FX888 digital soldering iron is not quite up to the job of soldering a joint where one or both halves is a big sheet of brass aka a heat sink. Cold joints were the order of the day and I put things aside while I mail ordered a big 120 watt iron in hopes of solving that problem.

Today I dusted things off and had a go, big iron and all. The thing is a monster with a half inch tip on it. Not for detail work but boy howdy, does it heat things up. Maybe too much. I managed to avoid desoldering everything previously attached but that wouldn’t be hard to do. Perhaps a finer tip is in order if I can get one.

Anyway, here are the two competing irons, the Hakkohakkoiron.jpg

And the 120 watt Weller old school iron (not so old school as to involve fire but still)bigiron

And here is the project to date. Todays progress was putting the sides, end and bottom together.binprogressjpg